unexpected eats: a culinary lover’s basic guide to nepal

Gooood day, friends!

Nepal isn’t often seen as a foodie destination, but OH MY it has incredible food. Today’s post is a list of the most memorable foods in Nepal. These are some of the foods I came across again and again! Have a read, start salivating, and book a trip to Nepal!

And to my vegetarian/vegan readers, don’t worry! You can find plenty of compliant options here!

Dal Baht

dal baht

You haven’t had a trip to Nepal if you haven’t eaten dal bhat. This is a go to food of mine- it’s absolutely delicious. Basically, dal baht is a set meal. You have your dal (lentils- consistency ranges from a curry to a soup), your bhat (rice), a veggie curry, and a papadum (which is a thin crispy food… essentially a really giant crisp). Often dal baht is served with pickle, a tomato based chilli sauce.

Best place for dal baht: teahouses while trekking- each place makes their own version of dal bhat- try a couple!

Momos

Momos are Nepali dumplings! They’re sometimes a little spicy, and either filled with veggies or meat. Like dal bhat, they’re served with pickle. There are different variations of momos. Pan fried, steamed, my favourites are jhol momos! They’re in a tomato/soybean soup. Sounds a little weird, but I promise you, they’re the best!

Best place for momos: Mo2s in Pokhara, Nepal

Thukpa

Thukpa is vegetable noodle soup! It often has a rich broth. My favourite time to have thukpa is after a long day of trekking. It’s a great comfort food, perfect for cold nights.

Best place for thukpa: teahouses after trekking!

Raksi

Ah, yes. Raksi. This is a spirit made from barley or millet. It’s often called Nepali wine. It has a light flavour and is great with warm water. Some of my favourite memories involve a bottle of raksi and lots of good company!

Tibetan Tea

tea

I once ordered this tea thinking I’d get a cup of masala chai, but BOY was I wrong. This tea is actually more like a broth, made with milk, butter, and salt.

Samosas

Samosas are the best foods to have as a snack on the go. I love picking up a couple and having them throughout the day. Admittedly not the healthiest, but delicious nonetheless.

Best place for samosas: roadside vendors!

Pakora

Pakora is essentially a fritter. You can have pakora with a base of chicken, veggies, paneer, and beef, although there are plenty of other variants. While some people enjoy pakora as a meal, I think it’s best served as a snack or appetizer. It’s a great sharing food.

*   *   *

While those are some of my favourite dishes, Nepali Cuisine is full of complex flavours, and there is a lot of variability throughout the country, as different regions have been influenced by the cultures that live within it. 


Overall, you’ll find plenty of veggie and potato-based foods, yoghurts/curds, curries, fried rice and noodle dishes, and mutton/yak meat, though it’s still common to find chicken and beef. There are so many dishes to try- have a look at what’s offered and pick what looks good!


Looking for a restaurant in Pokhara? These are my all-time favourites. 

 

 

 

2 thoughts on “unexpected eats: a culinary lover’s basic guide to nepal

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s